Feeling Worn Out by Social Media? Me, too.

This season has only seen more and more polarization online.

I don’t know about you, but every time I log into Twitter, I start feeling the strain & drain by the time I’ve scrolled through about 20 tweets. There are a handful of reasons for this that I’m aware of, and certainly more that are less obvious:

  1. Almost everyone is (hard) selling something: Their ideals, worldview, beliefs.
  2. Right now, especially, everyone is angry about something (some rightfully so).
  3. Encouragement seems to be at an all-time low.
  4. There’s not a lot to contribute to a conversation online that will really move the needle on any important issues. (How often has your mind been changed by a Twitter discussion?)
  5. On the flip-side, it can be challenging to contribute positively offline (in the real world) due to ongoing Coronavirus concerns.

And at its foundation, social media tends to be draining by default, which certainly doesn’t help matters any.

Photo by Maria Teneva

The struggle is this: Without social media, the only voices you hear from are 1) people in your direct vicinity (very few, due to social distancing), and 2) the mainstream media (who are all politically charged in one way or another). If you choose to set Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc. aside for some period, the diversity of voices you’d usually prefer to hear from are nearly altogether absent.

But… maybe that’s precisely what I need… at least, for a time. Hey, it could be what you need, too. After all, for laypeople (like myself), being present and active in our various localized communities is likely 100x more impactful than anything we could say or do online.

Makes this post feel a bit silly. :shrug:

What are you doing to battle the weight of the world we’re all experience because of our hyper-connectedness in this present age? How are you taking care of yourself, and how are you balancing that with the energy required to show empathy and compassion towards others?

– Zach

Battles, May 2020

There is nothing like the shocking surprise of taking a plastic dinosaur to the skull while you’re playing with your toddler. Dino Doctor. That’s the ironic given name of the pink velociraptor toy introduced to my noggin, curtesy our two year-old.

Painful as playing with toy dinosaurs can be, I wish life was more like the dino battles I have with my kid. The plastic toys take turns winning battles against each other, and get back up immediately after defeat. Their damage is pretend, impermanent, and it lasts no longer than the present moment.

Not so with the rest of life. Our world is broken. This season has been wrought by sickness, political deceit, information warfare, and more journalistic fear mongering than I know I’ve ever had to deal with.

Columbus, OH

On top of all those things that have become part of our “new normal,” it’s been disturbing to watch so much pain unfold this week in Minneapolis, Columbus, and in other major cities around the country. Murder is a horrid crime. Violence and destruction in any form, but especially against our own neighbors, is a devastating and foolish reaction. Both are condemnable, the embodiment of total depravity. No one should ever have to lose a family member to a violent crime, and neither peaceful protestors, nor those on the receiving end of rioters’ destruction should have to experience the pain and hurt they’re going through.

I can’t comprehend the pain many are feeling, but I’m praying for all the families that have been and will be affected, for the hearts of those who are in agony, and for tangible forward progress that leaves our society a better place where everyone is treated with the dignity and respect they deserve.

Stay safe, fam. Treat each other with the love you want to see embodied in our children, and in the rest of society. God bless.

– Zach