My First Year+ of Remote-Work

We moved from Orlando to the greater Columbus area, Ohio in October of 2018. I was fortunate enough to keep my job after the move and transition to remote-work.

It took us about six months to find and move into a home. We happened to move when Columbus was one of the hottest markets in the nation. During that part of our transition, I worked out of a co-working space for a few months, out of coffee shops for a month and a half, and from our home office ever since we closed on the house, a couple months before we moved in.

It’s not all sunshine and skittles.

I had read a lot about the challenges and benefits of remote-work before pursuing it myself. The early “research” helped me remain focused and avoid falling on my face when it came time to make the transition.

There are lots of pros and cons in any working situation, and I found first-hand that working remotely is no exception to that. If you asked me to fall to one side of the fence regarding whether remote-work is better or worse than working from an office, I have to say that it is better, but only because the pros outweigh the cons (yes, the cons).

Cons

I’m only starting with the cons because I like to end on positive notes, and not because these are the things that most easily come to my mind when working remotely.

  • Being somewhere in-person can have a different vibe… you can get the temperature of a room a bit more easily during meetings. That said, it’s a bummer to have to be dialed in for every meeting (but I’m fortunate to have a team who doesn’t make a big deal out of it, especially given how many we have in a given week).
  • White-boarding sessions are… difficult.
  • No commute has it’s downsides: No forced-time for podcasts or morning news, and no natural mental transition from home life to work life.
  • Having a home office instead of open floor-plan / open workspaces means fewer opportunities to socialize with co-workers and build camaraderie. It’s fairly normal to only hear from people when they need something from you.
  • It’s easy to feel shut-in, especially after you realize how much easier it is to work with external monitors than on a single screen at a coffee shop out on the town.
  • No free lunches during “Lunch & Learn” sessions. No free snacks or drinks. (This is small potatoes, especially if you’re working on a diet.) (I mean that as a figure of speech — no one is eating small potatoes for snacks at the office.)
  • Speaking of lunches, lunches and happy hours with team members have to be crammed in during travel weeks to the home office, which is a bummer because I really enjoy our Product Management and Application teams I work with.

Pros

Alrighty, now that we got those out of the way, it’s time to talk pros. This is where the magic happens. A lot of people in the remote-work Twitter community have already covered these over and over again, but here are the ones I find especially true in my life.

  • Uninterrupted focus time is easier to come by when I can set my Teams status to Do Not Disturb, and hunker down on project planning, documentation or user story writing. It’s the good-life for people who are naturally more introverted.
  • Separation from the rest of my team gives me even more reason to do my craft well and to provide clear and concise documentation for both now and posterity. I love this part of my job, which is why this is on the Pros list.
  • Daily commute time is zero minutes. Even though my company has to maintain some level of synchronous communication, I get to spend mornings with my family until the workday officially starts, see them at lunch, and I’m almost never late to dinner.
  • It’s easy to build camaraderie with other remote employees.
  • Short neighborhood walks with my wife and son are an incredible way to take a break when in need of some fresh air.
  • If I meet someone across town for coffee in the morning, I don’t have to rush back to an office to start the workday. I can hang out and work from the coffee shop until lunch, and then commute home during the lunch hour.
  • Dieting is easier without a wall full of free snacks. My dad-bod especially thanks me for this aspect of the transition.
  • There’s always enough coffee, and it always tastes just right.
  • It’s easy to manage contracted home projects without the stress of having to drive back and forth to check on their work.
  • I can play the guitar or piano during a lunch-break to exercise the other side of the brain and de-stress.
  • My wife has the flexibility to knock out some errands mid-day during our son’s naps, since I can keep an eye on the monitor at home while he sleeps.
  • I receive no judgement for working without shoes on. Pants are a must, though… I don’t know about you remote-workers who don’t get dressed for the day. Y’all crazy.
  • I’m at the head of the table for virtually every meeting (video-calls, am I right)? This actually belongs on the Cons list… haha.

Working remotely is certainly a different beast. You won’t know if you like it until you have an opportunity to try it, and I can promise that when you try it, you will miss things about the office-life while simultaneously discovering new, health- and family-positive aspects of remote-work that bring you joy.

Ten steps to effective remote-work

I think that if I had to make a list of ten things remote-workers need to do in order to be effective in their jobs, my list would repeat “Communicate well” seven times, and then end with:

  • Write everything down and make it accessible.
  • Remember that you’re not going crazy; breathe.
  • Exercise grace in your thoughts and interactions.

I’ll flesh those out in another post, someday.